Qantas

Qantas lets lounge visitors order their coffee via their smartphone

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Taking a cue from Starbucks’ mobile ordering service, as well as fellow down-under airline Air New Zealand’s coffee ordering service, Qantas recently introduced a new service at its lounges across Australia that invites lounge visitors to order their barista-made coffee via their smartphone.

In an effort to offer peace of mind to busy travellers who have navigated traffic and queues at security before having to line up again in the lounge to get a barista-made coffee, Qantas has partnered with Skip, a free app that helps customers “skip the queue” by ordering and paying for coffee and food.

In the Qantas Clubs alone, baristas brew over 1,000 cups of tea and coffee every day. In an average week the Sydney Qantas Club sees the biggest demand for coffee, with 6am to 7am being the peak demand time.

The mobile ordering service has been available since July 2016 and the Skip app can be used to order coffee at Qantas Clubs and Business Lounges at Adelaide, Brisbane, Canberra, Melbourne, Perth and Sydney domestic airports.

Qantas passengers using the Skip app can also select the time they want to collect their coffee and receive a text message when their order is ready. In addition, touchscreens have been installed around the lounges so those who aren’t Skip users can order before walking up to the bar.

According to Skip general manager Bill Bizos during the soft launch most people preferred downloading the app to using kiosks. Read full article »

Qantas Frequent Flyer launches health insurance; members can earn miles by excercising

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By Raymond Kollau, airlinetrends.com

Many airline passengers lament the traditional loyalty program format, which has become somewhat antiquated and can take forever to produce any useable benefit. But in a new loyalty tie-up with Aussie health insurance provider nib, Qantas is demonstrating that it understands how to engage people in a digital world.

Beginning later this year, Qantas Frequent Flyer program members can purchase Qantas Assure, a range of health insurance products powered by nib. Those who sign up can also earn Qantas Points faster than with flying alone, because they will collect points for achieving fitness goals.

Mobile app
Qantas Assure customers will be able to download an app to a number of different wearable and mobile devices.

Using the app, members will be able to choose from a variety of daily or weekly targets depending on their lifestyles, with the number of frequent flyer points earned increasing with the size of the target. The app will monitor (by counting steps, for example) the customer as he or she progresses through the challenge and reward completion with Qantas Points that can be used on flights, upgrades, hotels, car hire, at the Qantas store, and more.

Eventually, points will be able to be earned for other forms of physical activity beyond walking and running. Qantas says its Assure plan will start with health insurance, but will expand to other types of insurance in future.

Popularity of fitness trackers
According to the Sydney Morning Herald, Qantas said there were estimates around one-quarter of Australians now own a fitness tracker, but fewer than one in five Australians took the recommended 10,000 steps per day.

Qantas Loyalty chief executive Lesley Grant said the idea behind Qantas Assure came from members saying they wanted to be rewarded for leading a more active lifestyle. About half of those polled during research said they would be more active if they were rewarded. Read full article »

Qantas commissions books that can be completed in flight time

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By Springwise

In today’s world of non-stop information and endless social network notifications, it’s hard to find the time to concentrate on just one story, never mind finishing a full-length novel.

The Netherlands’ VertragingsApp has already encouraged train passengers to discover short story authors based on their delay time, and now a new project has created a range of fiction titles for customers of Australia’s Qantas airline, selected to correspond with flight times.

Titled ‘A Story For Every Journey’, the project is a collaboration with Sydney-based ad agency Droga5. The campaign used statistics from publishing house Hachette to discern that the average reader can finish around 200 to 300 words – or one page – each minute. Taking into account time set aside for meals and naps, customers should be able to read the books in exactly the time it takes to set off and land.

The range was selected while keeping in mind the airline’s Platinum Flyers demographic – mostly male customers – meaning they suitably span the thriller, crime and nonfiction genres. Penned by notable Australian authors and stylishly designed by UK-based agency Paul Belford, the airline is hoping to attract an upmarket audience by offering the novels on its extended flights. Video of the campaign here.

Given that airplanes are one of the few places where use of electronic devices is actually discouraged, the books could take off with those who fly regularly. Are there other ways to tailor literature to different reading environments to help consumers rediscover the novel?

Qantas unveils ‘next generation’ check-in for its frequent flyers

Qantas has unveiled what it calls a ‘next generation’ check-in experience. The new ground service provides premium Qantas passengers on domestic flights with a smart card-based check-in, as well as electronic bags tags that keeps track of their luggage. The new check-in is designed by renowned designer Marc Newson who earlier created Qantas’ A380 cabin and its first class lounges

The ‘next generation’ check-in will be trialled from August 1st in Perth among 100,000 Qantas premium Frequent Flyer members, who will receive a new smart chip-embedded Qantas Frequent Flyer card, called the ‘Q Card’. Passengers arriving at the airport who have not already checked in either online or on their mobile, can check in simply by tapping their Q card against a scanning point. A visual alert confirms a successful check-in, and the frequent flyer card is turned into an electronic boarding card, which the passenger can use to self-board at the gate. Travelers also receive a confirmation SMS with details such as seat number, departure gate and boarding time. Read full article »