Local Heroes: How local stores and restaurants are gaining presence at airports

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By Hildegard Assies, airporttrends•com

The long-standing relationship between people and brands is broken. According to Havas Media, 54 percent of consumers worldwide do not trust brands. Much of the trust, respect and loyalty people had for many global brands have been falling for the last three decades. Due to irresponsible business practices and food scandals that have recently been in the news around the world, the dominant sentiment is that many organisations have become big by doing wrong.

This confrontation of consumers with the consequences of mass consumption, results that consumers are slowly changing the way they live and consume. Consumption has moved beyond the merely transactional an instead of looking for “more”, consumers are on the look out for honest products and services in an authentic environment. They search for unique places and brands that they do want to be associated with and improve their wellbeing but most importantly, they can trust.

The rise of local flavor
Trust starts from scratch again by smaller companies and brands that are quite close to us. Brands which want to do right instead of doing less worse. And that’s why we see the rise of local flavor. Just have a look at the rising number of urban farmer markets or eco-friendly products in supermarkets. And why is it that we search for this radically good coffee made by a passionate barista in a place where we feel at home?

Tyler Brûlé from Monocle underlined in his keynote speech at the recent ACI Trading Conference in Zurich that the age of mass, uniform, global sameness has passed. Mature consumers move on to products that offer a full story of tradition and craftsmanship. Connecting your products or services to specific locales will make them more relevant, more exclusive and correspondingly more exciting and desirable. Read full article »

Cebu Pacific taps into Hong Kong monsoon season to promote flights to the Philippines

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This case appears in the June 2014 edition of the Airline Marketing Benchmark, a monthly report by airlinetrends.com and SimpliFlying, which identifies the latest innovative marketing capaigns recently launched by airlines around the world. Learn more »

The effectiveness of outdoor advertising is often a result of its originality. Europe’s third largest low-cost carrier Norwegian, for example, has built a reputation when it comes to launching innovative campaigns to persuade Scandinavians to book a flight to a southern, more sunny, destination in Europe.

Earlier this year, the airline asked commuters at Oslo’s central train station to have their picture taken and get their skin tone saturation measured digitally. The contestants’ images then were directly uploaded onto a giant screen, where the audience could follow who was the palest person in the league. The three palest contestants won a trip to sunny Gran Canaria.

On a similar note, last year Norwegian installed a rain gauge on bus shelters that recorded how much rain fell in the city to push people to get out of the country (video here), while in 2011 as part of its ‘Internet Sun Generator campaign’, Norwegian tracked down negative winter-related expressions on Facebook, Twitter and blogs, and converted this information into a digital formula that controlled a big artificial sun places placed in front of Oslo’s central railway station. The more negative the conversation about the winter-darkness, the stronger the sun would shine.

Cebu Pacific
Meanwhile in Hong Kong, which receives just 100 hours of sunshine during its summer monsoon season, Cebu Pacific – the largest low-cost carrier of the Philippines – used the wet weather as an integral part of a campaign to drive bookings to a much sunnier Philippines.

The clever campaign used water repellent spray was used to draw ads onto the ground in high traffic areas throughout the city, making them invisible until wet weather hits, when water droplets roll off the sprayed surface, revealing a brief tagline, “It’s Sunny in the Philippines.” Read full article »

Infographic » What makes great airline marketing?

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Our research into over 350 airline marketing case-studies across the globe has resulted in the publication of over 20 issues of our monthly Airline Marketing Benchmark Report, in partnership with SimpliFlying. This monthly report service contains our selection of 15 of the most innovative airline marketing case studies that show how airlines are breaking through the advertising clutter to reach and engage their target audience.

While these premium reports are subscribed to by the likes of Etihad, Turkish Airlines, Aeroflot, Qantas, Air New Zealand, Aer Lingus, Google, Boeing, Airbus and others, we thought we’d also share some of the most interesting statistics and take-aways from the case-studies we published.

Here are some key take-aways before getting to the infographic below:

5 CATEGORIES | Airline marketing and communication initiatives can be split into 5 types of campaigns: Experiential, social, digital, traditional, themed events.

EXPERIENTIAL |As the airline industry still captures the public’s imagination (despite all the hassle of flying), airlines are very active in creating temporary venues where the public can experience their products and services.

SOCIAL, DIGITAL | Unsurprisingly, a lot of innovation is taking place in the social and digital domains, with social and digital clocking in nearly 50 percent of the 350 campaigns we researched.

INNOVATIVE | European airlines lead with the most number of innovative marketing campaigns, creating over 140 airline marketing campaigns that made it to our reports over the last two years. Read full article »

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Smart design: Fixed headrest support on Etihad’s new Economy seats

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At airlinetrends.com we love smart design innovations, especially in the space-constrained Economy cabin. Think Air New Zealand’s innovative Skycouch (which will also be installed on China Airlines’ upcoming B77-300ERs), as well as the airline’s cleverly designed headrest pillows.

Economy Smart Seats
Lost a bit in the press blitz around Etihad’s new über-premium A380 comes a smart design innovation of the airline’s new Economy seats. The so-called ‘Economy Smart Seats’ (video here) feature a ‘fixed wing’ headrest, designed to provide a firm surface for passengers to lean on while sleeping.

The new Economy seats will first appear on Etihad’s A380 and Boeing 787-9 Dreamliners. On the A380, the economy seats will be nearly 19 inches wide and arranged in a 3-4-3 fashion with a 31-32 inch pitch. On Etihad’s Boeing 787 the seats will be configured 3-3-3 with a seat width of 17.2 inches and seat pitch ranging from 31 to 33 inches. Each Economy Smart Seat reclines 6 inches and has adjustable lumbar support.

Etihad Design Consortium
Etihad’s new interiors are the work of the so-called Etihad Design Consortium, which consists of British agencies Acumen Design Associates, Factorydesign and Honour Branding. Acumen has been  responsible for seating for First Class, Business, and Economy, while Factorydesign was assigned passenger experience and interiors elements such as galleys, lavatories and passenger destination zones. Honour Branding was responsible for the coordination of the project and advising Etihad on the innovation process. Read full article »

Easyjet to trial drones, virtual reality glasses, e-paper to improve operations

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By Raymond Kollau, airlinetrends.com

We were reminded of one of our favourite quotes from sci-fi writer William Gibson: “The future is already here, it is just not evenly distributed,” when we read easyJet’s announcement that the airline will use unmanned drones to inspect its aircraft.

Drones
The drones will be programmed to assess the carrier’s fleet of Airbus A319 and A320 planes, reporting back to engineers on any damage which may require further inspection or maintenance work. As EasyJet put it on Twitter: “Drones will help carry out detailed inspections, allowing us to move around every axis of the aircraft.”

EasyJet’s engineering head, Ian Davies, said: “Drone technology could be used extremely effectively to help us perform aircraft checks. “Checks that would usually take more than a day could be performed in a couple of hours and potentially with greater accuracy. […] For example, dones could be used to pick up damage caused by a lightning strike, the kind of incident that can require a full day of inspections.”

EasyJet is working with the Coptercraft and Measurement Solutions companies as well as Bristol Robotics Laboratory on modifying existing technology so it can bring in the drones. Dr Arthur Richards, head of aerial robotics at the Bristol Robotics Laboratory, said: “Aircraft inspection is a great application for drones. Coupled with smart navigation and computer vision, they can get accurate data from really awkward places.”

The airline hopes to introduce the drones as early as next year following trials in the next few months.

Virtual reality glasses
EasyJet also announced that it was looking at deploying new technology to enable a remote engineering team to see exactly what a pilot or engineer is seeing using virtual reality glasses.

The glasses use the world’s first high definition see-through display system, providing augmented reality to help easyJet remotely diagnose a technical issue. At the moment engineers and pilots email pictures and call Easyjet’s Operations Control Centre to try to resolve issues over the phone, but with the wearable technology they will be able to relay images directly back to base. Read full article »

Beyond First Class: Etihad’s new A380 to feature 3-room ‘The Residence’ suite

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This article originally appeared on TheDesignAir

By Jonny Clark, TheDesignAir

Etihad Airways has unveiled the world’s first private multi-room cabin on a commercial passenger aircraft. Called ‘The Residence’, the ‘uber premium’ space will feature a living room, double bedroom, separate ensuite shower room, and for the first time in the airline industry, a dedicated, trained butler.

Measuring an unparalleled 125 square feet in total area, The Residence will be located on the forward upper deck of the Abu Dhabi-based carrier’s new fleet of Airbus A380s and will be available for single or double occupancy. Yes. That’s 125 square feet of your own private space, and if that wasn’t enough, you still have access to the First Class offerings including the brand new onboard lounge.

Peter Baumgartner, Etihad Airways’ Chief Commercial Officer, said: “The Residence will set Etihad Airways apart from the rest of the industry and allow us to provide the complete range of world-class products and services to cater for the individual tastes of every VIP traveller.

“This is the culmination of five years of intensive effort and research into how Etihad Airways can provide an unparalleled VIP experience. Without doubt, we are ushering in a new era of luxury travel in commercial aviation.”

Living room, master bedroom, shower
The living room in The Residence is furnished with a two-seat reclining sofa upholstered in Poltrona Frau leather, dual marquetry dining tables and a chilled mini-bar. A touchscreen control unit operates the retractable ottoman, the ambient and mood lighting, window shading, adjusts seat position and firmness, and activates the in-seat massage functions.

A door and passageway separate the living room from the master bedroom and the ensuite shower room. The bedroom features a Poltrona Frau upholstered 82 inch long double bed with custom-made mattress, bedside unit, wardrobe, and under-bed stowage for hand luggage (video here). Read full article »

India’s low-cost carriers get creative with their buy-on-board food packaging

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By Raymond Kollau, airlinetrends.com

Along with basic objectives such as protection, preservation and convenience, attractive and fun packaging appeals to consumers’ emotions and brings a product alive, while clever packaging can also convince consumers to try something new just because of the way it looks.

As airlines are starting to approach the passenger experience in a more holistic way, they are also starting to pay attention to details such as the packaging of meals and drinks as an extension of their brand.

Or as Travel + Leisure magazine put it recently: “From hyper-local delicacies to iconic sweets, the best in-flight snacks deliver a sense of place, express an airline’s personality—and make a tasty souvenir.”

Adds Nikos Loukas of airline food website InflightFeed, “Airline food packaging needs to be fun and engage the customer during the meal service, it gives them something to think about but can also work as inflight entertainment.”

Two great examples of attractive and fun food packaging can be found in India, where low-cost carriers JetKonnect and IndiGo have come up with quirky buy-on-board ranges.

JetKonnect
Mumbai-based JetKonnect, the low-cost subsidiairy of Jet Airways, has hired local ad agency Grandmother to make plane food something passengers might actually want to eat, via fun packaging that features Indian touches.

Each item on the buy-on-board menu tells a different story of the ‘love’ for food. For example, the packaging of the savoury pastry samosas is the tale of ‘Sam’ meeting ‘Hosa’, while a tin of nuts features ‘Dr. Nutman.’ The cookie packet is an ode to a robber, and features the words ‘chor-police’ (robber-cop in Hindi). Stories featuring each of the characters are printed on the colorful packets.

According to Grandmother, JetKonnect approached the agency to reinvent its entire line of on-board perishable and non-perishable products. Since the packaging system involved multiple products in different materials, the agency invented a story that would tie all products into one umbrella story that would engage, educate and inform, all the while making food fun and and enjoyable.

Or as Grandmother puts it: “Value is being surprised and delighted when you least expect it. Why should packaging be static? Why can’t it be a story in itself? Can it make someone read before grabbing a bite?”
Read full article »

Iberia and airberlin latest carriers to develop smartwatch boarding pass

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This article first appeared on Future Travel Experience

Following the recent launch by Vueling of the first smartwatch-based boarding pass, Iberia and airberlin have announced the development of their own wearable boarding passes.

Spanish carrier Iberia has teamed up with Samsung to offer the mobile version of its website, including boarding passes, on the Samsung Gear 2 smartwatch, while users of airberlin’s iPhone app can send their digital boarding pass to their Pebble or Pebble Steel smartwatch.

airberlin x Pebble
Referring to the airberlin product, the carrier’s Senior Vice President Marketing, André Rahn, said: “airberlin is the world’s first airline to offer iPhone users the possibility of boarding using a barcode downloaded to their smartwatch. The watch also displays a quick overview of the flight guest’s departure time, gate number and seat. This option makes opening the boarding pass on the iPhone or even searching for the paper pass in your purse a thing of the past. It’s just another step airberlin is taking to simplify the boarding process through technical innovation.”

Iberia x Samsung
Iberia, meanwhile, is working on an updated version of its app for Android devices which will allow boarding passes to be automatically downloaded to passengers’ Samsung Gear 2 smartwatches when they check-in using their smartphone.

Miguel Angel Henales, Head of Iberia’s Digital Business, commented: “Working on this app has been a challenge, because we are producing prototypes, creating something that is new to the market. We are one of the first airlines to offer a wearable boarding pass, which we think will be very popular among our passengers.” Read full article »

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Four Seasons’ uber-premium Boeing 757 takes passengers on round-the-world cruise

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By Raymond Kollau, airlinetrends.com

One of our favourite topics (and recommendation to our airline clients) is that the airline industry should be looking much closer to the hospitality industry for best practices on how to improve the passenger experience.

Airlines that have applied some ‘tricks’ from the hotel sector include Singapore Airlines, Cathay Pacific and Japan Airlines who welcome passengers in their premium classes with hand-written “Welcome Onboard” cards, while Etihad, Virgin Australia and Virgin America are among the few airlines that refer to their passengers as guests. American Airlines now refers to its premium cabin as a ‘hotel in the sky’, while Delta has partnered with Westin Hotels to let passengers sleep comfortable on Westin’s ‘Heavenly’ range of bedding.

On the ground, a handful hotels have opened their own lounges at airports, be it that for the moment these initiatives can be found at small airports only. For example, Four Seasons Resorts recently opened an airport lounge at Honolulu International Airport to welcome Four Seasons guests enroute to the island of Lanai.

Four Seasons ‘air cruise’
Now Four Seasons is looking to elevate its hospitality brand up in the air. The premium hotel group has unveiled its Four Seasons-branded Boeing 757 which will carry guests on its around-the-world ‘air cruises’.

Four Seasons, which operates 92 hotels and private residences around the world, first began offering its around-the-world trip in 2012 using a non-branded jet that carried 78 travelers. According to Susan Helstab, Four Seasons’ EVP Marketing, “The branded jet was developed to fulfill the wealthy’s wish to explore the world in utmost comfort. Taking our legendary service to the skies is a natural extension of what we’ve been doing in our hotels for more than 50 years.”

Or as Bloomberg summarizes it nicely: “First came the Orient Express train. Then the Queen Mary ocean liner. Now the Four Seasons jet?”
Read full article »

Most interesting seating innovations from the 2014 Hamburg Aircraft Interiors Expo

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This article originally appeared on Airchive | Images courtesy of Jason Rabinowitz.

By Jason Rabinowitz, AirlineFlyer

Imagine a place where every single aspect of an airplane’s inside was on display and up for sale: From seats to fasteners, plastic mouldings to satellite arrays. Put it all in Hamburg, Germany, spread it out over seven halls, and call it Aircraft Interiors Expo 2014.

Industry firms large and small (and tiny) all brought their newest, latest, and greatest to this year’s show, hoping to capture the interest of airlines in this multi-billion dollar industry. Throughout the show, there were a few main recurring themes that have been the constant theme in the industry for a few years now. As Data Research Manager for Routehappy.com, it was my job to find the most interesting trends.

More seats in economy, less space, few but important innovations
Flying economy in the modern age has gotten to the point where 32″ pitch is a luxury, and 30″ pitch is the new norm. Slimline seats are the new cool, and airlines are gobbling these up faster than vendors can manufacture them. Reduced seat pitch, width, and cushioning are coming to an airplane near you, but it isn’t all bad.

ACRO
Seat manufacturer ACRO has managed to develop a seat with so much space carved out of it around the knees that a configuration of 29″ inches feels more like 32″ to the passenger. That may not sound like much, but it is the difference between being horribly uncomfortable and content for a short flight. The seats come with a positively tiny but super strong tray table which is barely wide enough to support an iPad. ACRO will start delivering these seats to Spirit Airlines for five retrofitted Airbus A319s and new A320 and A321 deliveries in 2015.

Recaro
One of the largest seat manufactures, Recaro, showed us that even the smallest of changes to their seats can have a large impact. We’ve all seen the photo showing various “innovative” ways passengers set up their own entertainment devices in economy, but Recaro has come up with a simple, yet ingenious solution to the problem.
Read full article »

South African LCC kulula partners with Unilever to surprise passengers with free meal

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By Raymond Kollau, airlinetrends.com

It is a well-known fact that the reason airplane food is often bland or boring is partly due to the pressurized airplane environment and the cool, dry cabin air, which dulls passengers’ tastebuds and leaves them with a muted perception of salty and sweet.

Kulula.com x Robertsons ‘SkyDine’
Combining several onboard hospitality trends – such as the growing number of airlines that organize ‘micro-events’ up in the air in order to put an original twist to the flight, the rise of brand collaborations to improve the passenger experience, and the popularity of generosity as a marketing tactic – South African LCC kulula.com and Unilever-owned Robertsons Herbs and Spices recently surprised unsuspecting kulula.com passengers on flights from Johannesburg to Cape Town with a three-course fine dining experience courtesy of Robertsons Spices.

On March 5th,  bloggers and food journalists from Cape Town and Johannesburg were invited by kulula.com to a surprise flight to Johannesburg, and on the return flight to Cape Town, South African celebrity chef and MasterChef South Africa judge Reuben Riffel introduced the surprise three-course meal which he had designed, and which was prepared by airline catering company Foodirections.

Riffel introduced his 3-course menu, emphasising that the flavours had to be stronger, due to the 35000 feet height at which the meal was eaten. The starter was a feta and leek tartlet; the main course a pistachio and black pepper crusted beef fillet; ended off with a dessert of ‘milk-a-roon mini sweet short crust pastry filled with cinnamon and mixed spice custard and Turkish delight’.

Three other kulula.com flights from Johannesburg to Cape Town surprised passengers with the same three-course meal. Read full article »

Delta upgrades cabin crew from Nokia smartphones to connected ‘phablets’

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By Raymond Kollau, airlinetrends.com

In the fall of 2013, Delta Air Lines started providing Nokia Lumia 820 smartphones to all of its 19,000 flight attendants. The Windows-based devices feature an app that is based on the Microsoft Dynamics point-of-sale system and also handles passenger manifests, frequent-flyer information, connecting-gate updates, and flight-attendant scheduling updates.

From smartphones to phablets
Now Delta has just announced it will be replacing the smartphones with larger Nokia Lumia 1520 ‘phablets’ and this fall will equip more than 20,000 flight attendants with the 6-inch screen devices. Dictribution will start in October with all flight attendants receiving the device by the end of the year.

In addition to its functionality as an in-flight sales device and replacement for the on-board manual, the Nokia Lumia 1520 phablet, running Windows Phone 8.1, will, as it develops, enable flight attendants to take customer meal orders, receive detailed information about their flight and provide information for personalized service, including customers’ frequent flyer status and potential need for special services during flight.

Personalization platform
Delta flight attendants were initially given Nokia Lumia 820 smartphones to do things like process on-board purchases more efficiently, according to Delta’s SVP In-Flight Services, Joanne Smith. “It’s just a start. […] “The emerging high-value customer expects us to know about them. Millennials want us to know where they like to travel, what their experience has been. Our flight attendants spend more time with our customers than any other group. They can supply that.”

According to Delta, the new devices are meant to serve as a platform for future, more personalized in-flight customer service. Says Delta CIO Theresa Wise: “The phablet is a great foundation for future software applications that, in time, will allow our flight attendants to readily access customer preferences, previous travel experiences with Delta and worldwide connectivity to the company, enabling them to provide the more tailored experience many customers have come to expect.”
Read full article »

EasyJet asks travellers to recognize it’s 10 millionth passenger at Toulouse Airport

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This case appears in the April 2014 edition of the Airline Marketing Benchmark, a monthly report by airlinetrends.com and SimpliFlying that identifies the latest innovative marketing capaigns recently launched by airlines around the world. Learn more » 

Tapping into the current nostalgia trend, childhood memories of the globally known ‘Guess Who?’ (a.ka. ‘Who Am I’) game were brought back to life in Toulouse-Blagnac on February 28th, when easyJet created a life-size, live version of the popular board game to celebrate the fact that in 10 years the airline had carried 10 million passengers through the southern France airport.

Situated airside, passengers were invited to get involved in a game to guess the 10 millionth passenger who was hidden in a group of 24 ‘extras’.

The rules mimicked the real-life game, so passengers has to ask questions such as “Does he/she have blue eyes? Is he/she wearing a hat?” etc, in order to eliminate as many of the 24 people with one question.

Those participants who correctly named the mystery passenger after eliminating the impostors were given free flights with easyJet. Video of the event here and more images here.

After the airport event, the airline put a digital version of the ‘Guess Who’ game online (called Enigme A Bord by easyJet France) for 10 days, which was played over 2,500 times on the first day alone.

Air France-KLM’s ‘e-tag & e-track’ turns suitcases into connected devices

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This article originally appeared on Future Travel Experience, the travel industry forum focused on enhancing the passenger experience on the ground and up in the air.

By Ryan Ghee, Future Travel Experience

Over the last 12 months, interest in permanent bag tags has increased apace as the viability of the concept has been proved, and Air France-KLM has this week launched the latest innovation in this field. The permanent bag tag, called eTag, and the eTrack tracking device have been developed by the airline alongside FastTrack Company, Samsonite and Dutch telco KPN with significant input also coming from Delta Air Lines.

eTag & eTrack
The eTag is an electronic baggage label that includes two e-ink displays and that attaches to the outside of the suitcase, while eTrack is placed inside the luggage. In addition, a limited edition suitcase – the Samsonite Track & Trace, which includes embedded eTag and eTrack devices – has been revealed.

Speaking to FTE, Manuel van Lijf, Manager Product Innovation, Air France-KLM, explained: “We’ve worked closely with our suppliers and with Delta to try to make this an industry initiative, not just an airline initiative, and we’ve had involvement from SkyTeam too and kept them updated throughout the process.

“We thought it would be useless to just develop something for us – we wanted to develop something that will benefit the industry and the passengers. The idea was to create a product that can be used by a passenger flying with Air France, KLM, Delta, Lufthansa or another airline, for instance. Why would a passenger buy a permanent tag that can only be used on one airline?”

FTE Editor Ryan Ghee was given a preview of the eTag, eTrack and Samsonite Track & Trace suitcase by Air France-KLM’s Manuel van Lijf and FastTrack Company’s Founder & CTO Graham Kelly; CEO Arthur Lahr; and Founder & CFO David van Hoytema.

GSM, GPS, Bluetooth, electronic ink
eTrack makes use of GSM, GPS and Bluetooth technology, which enables it to be tracked by a smartphone, while eTag also utilises Bluetooth. Passengers with a Flying Blue account can link the eTag and eTrack devices to their account, so when they check-in online, the permanent bag tag will be automatically updated within just five seconds.

The tag communicates with the outside world via the eTrack device, and directly with smartphones using Bluetooth, but the two products can also be used independently. Read full article »

London Gatwick Airport to open ‘Regus Business Workboxes’ near departure gates

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By Raymond Kollau, airlinetrends.com

In the past few years, so-called ‘sleeping pods’ have made their debut ‘airside’ at several airports around the world, offering passengers in transit a cheap way to catch some sleep while waiting for their next flight. Sleep boxes (also known as Napcabs) can be found at airports including Munich, Dubai, Abu Dhabi and Delhi.

On a related note, catering to tech-toting travellers who want to stay productive while on the road, Helsinki Airport has created what it calls ‘Suvanto’ private pods that provide passengers with a tranquil space to make their waiting time more comfortable and make it more convenient to work in between flights.

Regus ‘Business Workbox’
The latest ‘private pod’ initiative will be launched at London Gatwick Airport and is targeted at passengers travelling for business. Gatwick Airport has partnered with workspace provider Regus to open the world’s first mobile ‘workboxes’ at departures areas at the airport’s South Terminal. The first four workboxes will be installed this summer.

The Regus ‘Business Workbox’ is a four square meter fully self-contained, resourced and private space will give individuals a space in the midst of the hustle and bustle of the departure gates, to make last-minute phone calls or finish emails before boarding their flight. The box uses acoustic insulation to ensure that road warriors have quiet, and the space is equipped to allow videoconferencing and listening to music privately.

Users can input their credit card details into a keypad to gain access, which costs GBP5 per hour, or GBP10 per day. Membership schemes are also available. Video of the WorkBox here. Read full article »